Dejavu Snowboard Design

Dejavu is all about the bright, fluro, neon patterned designs. These designs are for both boys and girls, between the ages of 18 – 25. I’ve done a survey on what snowboarders between these ages, beginner, intermediate and expert want.

So that’s why Dejavu is all about the bright, fluro patterns, so they can say, that’s my board. They have also said they want Dejavu’s designs so there snowboards stand out against the snow, especially if they lose their boards.

Also Dejavu is all about helping the Snow Industry, as it’s being effected by Climate Change and the Snow Industry/Businesses depend on robust winters. That’s why Dejavu is donating 5% to help stop Climate Change.

Dejavu is all about standing out against the crowd and the snow.

Post 6 – Interior Designer, Frank Lloyd Wright

Post 6 – Frank Lloyd Wright

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Frank Lloyd Wright was born Frank Lincoln Wright on the 8th of June, 1867 in Richland Centre, Wisconsin and died in Phoenix, Arizona on the 9th of April, 1959.

He was an American architect, interior designer, writer and educator, he designed more than 1,000 structures and completed 532 works. Frank had a philosophy called Organic Architecture, which he believed in designing structures which were in harmony with humanity and it’s environment.

His design Fallingwater (1935) was best exemplified by this philosophy, which has been called “the best all-time work of American architecture.” Frank was a leader of the Prairie School movement of architecture and developed the concept of the Usonian home, his unique vision for urban planning in the United States.

Franks work includes original and innovative examples of many different building types, including offices, churches, schools, skyscrapers, hotels and museums. Many of the interior elements of his buildings, such as the furniture and stained glass, Frank designed.

In the United States and in Europe, he was a popular lecturer, Frank authored 20 books and many articles. His colourful personal life often made headlines, most notably for the 1914 fire and murders at his Taliesin studio. Already well known during his lifetime, Frank was recognised in 1991 by the American Institute of Architects as “the greatest American architect of all time.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Lloyd_Wright#Death_and_legacy

http://www.franklloydwright.org

http://www.wrightontheweb.net

http://www.cmgww.com/historic/flw/bio.html

http://www.taliesinpreservation.org

Post 5 – Alex Perry, Fashion Designer

Alex Perry

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Alex Perry was born in Sydney, Australia. Alex Perry is an Australian fashion designer, he’s been particularly noted for his designs in women’s wear.

In 1984 Alex graduated from East Sydney Technical College, he worked as a model agent representing Australian models for international modelling agencies.

Alex’s first atelier (studio) was opened in 1992, creating gowns, corsets and sheaths. These gowns were photographed by Vogue Australia, and then became the Alex Perry’s trademark signature in his first editorial shoot.

In 1994 Perry relocated his salon to Double Bay, Sydney, where he built up his clientele to include high profile celebrities, social identities and personalities.

Alex Perry was a designer at the inaugural Mercedes Australian Fashion Week held in May 1995, and has shown collections each year. Over the past eleven years the Alex Perry fashion shows evolved into what has been described as “the most glamorous show of the week”.

Models featured in Alex Perry’s runway shows, such as Linda Evangelista, Megan Gale, Miranda Kerr, Kate Fischer, Alyssa Sutherland, Nicole Trunfio and most recently Lily Cole.

In 1998 Alex launched his first “ready to wear” collection. In May 2002, Alex launched his Sydney salon at The Strand Arcade. Featuring stilettos, jewelled clutch handbags and bijoux earrings for evening and bridal, Alex’s debut accessories collection was launched in 2006.

In the last couple of years Alex Perry has started making designer sunglasses and glasses for Specsavers.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alex_Perry

http://www.fashionmodeldirectory.com/designers/alex-perry/

http://www.vogue.com.au/people/designers/alex+perry,3

http://www.alexperry.com.au/

http://www.specsavers.com.au/glasses/designer-glasses/alex-perry/#br=1

Post 4 – Judianna Makovsky, Costume Designer

Judianna Makovsky

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Judianna Makovsky was born in New Jersey, USA on the 24th of August 1967. She has worked from 1984 and is still continuing to this present day, the lastest movie she has done was just last year (2012) on the ‘Hunger Games.’

She has done a lot of costume designs for many popular films, the way that Judianna got into costume design was she went to university, graduated school and did the Yale Drama School thing and all of that.

One of her teachers from Yale, who’s an English Designer who lives in New York and from there she was lucky enough to be introduced to Milena Canonero, a costume designer for films. Judianna was then Milena’s assistant designer on The Cotton Club, she never did wardrobe, she was always assistant designer.

Pretty much straight after ‘The Cotton Club,’ Judianna did ‘Big’ and ‘Gardens of Stone’ but she still went back and worked with Milena on several projects. Judianna became her associate designer because she had to leave early. She worked her way up from being assistant designer to associate designer to co-designer and then she was the designer and Milena was the consultant.

Some of Judianna’s Awards and Nominations

1998

nominated to Saturn Award for Best Costume – “Pleasantville”

nominated to Academy Award for Costume Design – “Pleasantville”

1999

nominated to Costume Designers Guild Award for Best Costume Design – Film – “Pleasantville”

nominated to Satellite Award for Best Costume Design – “Pleasantville”

Costume Designers Guild Award for Best Costume Design – Film – “Pleasantville”

2001

nominated to BAFTA Award for Best Costume Design – “Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone”

nominated to Academy Award for Costume Design – “Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone”

nominated to Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Costume Design – “Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone”

nominated to Saturn Award for Best Costume – “Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone”

Saturn Award for Best Costume – “Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone”

2002

nominated to Costume Designers Guild Award for Best Costume Design – Period or Fantasy Film – “Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone”

Costume Designers Guild Award for Best Costume Design – Period or Fantasy Film – “Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone”

2003

nominated to Academy Award for Costume Design – “Seabiscuit”

2004

nominated to Costume Designers Guild Award for Best Costume Design – Period or Fantasy Film – “Seabiscuit”

nominated to Satellite Award for Best Costume Design – “Seabiscuit”

2006

nominated to Saturn Award for Best Costume – “X-Men: The Last Stand”

2007

nominated to Costume Designers Guild Award for Best Costume Design – Fantasy Film – “X-Men: The Last Stand”

2013

nominated to Costume Designers Guild Award for Best Costume Design – Fantasy Film – “The Hunger Games”

nominated to Costume Designers Guild Award for Excellence in Commercial Costume Design (Captain Morgan Black)

nominated to Costume Designers Guild Award for Career Achievement in Film Award

Costume Designers Guild Award for Career Achievement in Film Award

Costume Designers Guild Award for Excellence in Commercial Costume Design (Captain Morgan Black)

http://www.hggirlonfire.com/category/judianna-makovsky/

http://www.allmovie.com/artist/judianna-makovsky-p100860

http://www.thefashionspot.com/celebrity-fashion/news//179041-costume-designer-judianna-makovsky-talks-superheroes-seabiscuit-and-those-outrageous-capitol-costumes

http://www.omnilexica.com/?q=judianna+makovsky

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0538721/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1

Post 3 – Tobie Giddio, Fashion Illustrator

Tobie Giddio

“Fine art and fashion coexist simultaneously and equally. There is an understanding. Each is in constant service to the other in a quest to express in the most extraordinary way possible.” -Tobie Giddio

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Tobie Giddio was born September 10th, 1963 and grew up in New Jersey, USA. In 1986, New York, she graduated from The Fashion Institute of Technology with a BFA in illustration, Tobie then later teaching in the illustration department of F.I.T.

She lives in New York where she is very involved with the study of African Dance, especially from Senegal with it’s social and traditional dances.

One of Tobie’s first assignments were for designer Norma Kamali and Bergdorf Goodman, she also illustrated for in the New York Times.

Relying on her inner memory, she stopped drawing from live models and poleroids in the 1990’s, she also started using more dramatic colours.

In the 1980’s she had started to initiate the simplicity of classic fashion, which she then started to further refine and simplify in the 1990’s. The simplification process created the natural progression towards deconstruction and abstraction.

Projects she has done in fashion have included work for Seibu Department stores, Neiman Marcus, The Limited stores and Ann Taylor Inc. who commissioned work for their windows and in-store displays. Some of her more recent work includes commissioned pieces for Apple Computers and Tiffany & Co.

Tobie’s work has also appeared in numerous publications including George, Glamour, Harpers Bazaar, Interview, Manhattan File, Marie Claire, Mode, the New Yorker and various editions of Vogue. Her corporate clients include Ann Taylor, Bergdorf Goodman, Garnet Hill, Giorgio Armani, Philip Morris, Pucci Mannequins, Nadrea, Max Factor, Seibu Department store in Japan, Barneys New York, Calvin Klein, Revlon and Tocca.

http://www.tobiegiddio.com/artist%e2%80%99s-statement/

http://www.fashionillustrationgallery.com/store/category/artists/tobie-giddio/

http://www.artelimited.com/artists/tobie-giddio/

http://www.fashionmodeldirectory.com/designers/tobie-giddio/

http://illustratorslounge.com/fashion/fashion-fridays-tobie-giddio

Post 1 – Subculture Tennis

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Subculture – Tennis

Fashion –

The fashion design aspect of tennis has changed through the many years of tennis. Some of the styles back in the late mid 1800’s for the men were long flannel pants, shirts, cardigans or sweater vests. These soon changed around about the 1930’s where male tennis players opted for shorts and shirts. The tennis fashion for women back in the days were long skirts and long sleeved shirts, as time went on, the skirts hemlines were put up to their knees and the skirts slowly got shorter to the time we are in now. The shirts were the same for women, they were slowly rolled up to show more arms. These days the clothing for men are shorts and collared shirts, for women they have dresses that fit to their bodies, skorts (skirts and shorts) and tank tops or collared shirts. This is so that they are more free, to movement of getting the tennis ball.

Hairstyles –

The hairstyles of tennis for women is up in ponytails, plaits, braids, buns so that their hair is not in the way of them trying to see the tennis ball or distracting them. This is also the same for men with shortish-longish hair, they have it in a ponytail or they have hats or bandanas to keep their hair out of there face.

Equipment –

The design aspect of the equipment these days is a lot different to what is was back in the mid to late 1800’s when they first started out. The equipment these days, the racquets, the strings for the racquets have changed to suit the player, so one player could want more spin, they would choose strings that are suited to spinning the ball. The racquets are bigger and more wider, then when tennis first started as the head of the racquet was small and made of wood, as to now when they are made from titanium and have bigger and wider heads to play with.

Shoes –

The style of shoes hasn’t really much changed, the only reason they have changed is so that they are more suited to your feet, as everyone has different type of feet. The technology of fitting and suiting your feet to the type of sand shoe or sport shoe, to give more comfort to your feet while you are continuously running around the court for hours at a time.

http://www.articledashboard.com/Article/History-of-Tennis-Wear-Following-The-Fashion-Trend/2218286

http://www.dailylife.com.au/dl-fashion/fashion-coverage/the-evolution-of-tennis-fashion-20130111-2cjwl.html

http://www.vogue.com.au/fashion/news/tennis+style+through+the+ages+,16359

http://www.tennis.com.au/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennis

Post 2 – Sitting Pretty, Marc Newson

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Post 2 – Marc Newson

Marc Andrew Newson is an Australian architectural, influential designer of our generation, he was born in Sydney, Australia on the 20th of October 1963. Marc graduated in 1984 at the Sydney College of the Arts in jewellery and sculpture.

Two years later, 1986, he staged a first exhibition featuring the Lockheed Lounge, through a grant he was awarded to from the Australian Crafts Council.

Through his designs, Marc incorporates a design called Biomorphism; this type of style uses smooth flowing lines, translucency, and transparency and tends to avoid/keep away from sharp edges.

In 1987, he moved to Tokyo where he lived and worked until then, where he then moved to Paris and set up a studio in 1991.

He then moved to London in 1997 where he and his partner Benjamin De Haan set up Marc Newson Ltd. Where Marc first studied at the Sydney College of the Arts, he is currently adjunct professor in Design.

In Time’s Magazine, in 2005 Marc Newson was selected as one of the top 100 most influential people of the year. In 2012 New Year Honours for services to Design, Newson was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE).

Amongst the highest selling works in auctions, Marc Newson work is with the highest selling works, as one of his three Lockheed Lounge Chairs sold for $968,000 at Sotheby’s in 2006 and an auction at Phillips De Pury & Company, £1,100,000 in 2009.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc_Newson

http://www.marc-newson.com/AboutBiography.aspx?GroupSelec..

http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/previous/marc_newson.php

http://www.gagosian.com/artists/marc-newson

http://designmuseum.org/design/marc-newson